“BROWN” EJECTOR

“BROWN” EJECTOR FOR STEAM OR AIR OPERATION

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ejectorsteamair

  • Bronze and Brass Construction

  • No Moving Parts

  • Available in Stainless Steel

  • Replacement Jets Available

  • Solid Construction

  • Simple to Operate

STEAM OPERATED – PUMPING LIQUID

A powerful steam operated jet pump for operating pressures from 25 to 150 pounds/sq in. For liquid transfer, agitating, mixing, heating and circulating liquids, priming pumps.

STEAM OR AIR OPERATED – PUMPING GASES

For evacuation of vessels, evacuation and moving of air and certain suitable gases, aerating, priming pumps, producing vacuum.

Approximate Dimensions
Model Number Overall Length Pipe Sizes
Steam Supply Suction

  Discharge

Inches mm BSP mm BSP mm BSP mm
1 4 5/8 117 3/8″ 10 1/2″ 15 1/2″ 15
2 5 1/2 140 1/2″ 15 3/4″ 20 3/4″ 20
3 6 3/8 162 3/4″ 20 1″ 25 1″ 25
4 7 5/16 185 1″ 25 1 1/4″ 32 1 1/4″ 32
5 8 9/16 218 1″ 25 1 1/2″ 40 1 1/2″ 40
6 10 1/8 257 1 1/4″ 32 2″ 50 2″ 50
7 11 3/16 284 1 1/2″ 40 2 1/2″ 65 2 1/2″ 65
8 13 7/8 352 2″ 50 3″ 80 3″ 80

 

 

 

 

 

Capacity of Brown Ejector – Steam Operated – Pumping Water


The capacities given in the table below are for 1 1/2″ size No. 5 ejector pumping water under various conditions of operating steam pressure, suction lift, suction water temperature and discharge head. Capacities for other sizes of ejectors can be determined by multiplying the values in the Table by the performance factors given in Table  5.

It will be noted from the table that a reduced steam pressure will often result in an increase in capacity. By throttling the steam supply to the ejector to the most efficient operating pressure, maximum economy of operation can be obtained. Viscous suction fluids or suction fluids with a specific gravity or specific heat value differing to a great extent from that of water will effect the capacity of ejector.


Capacity in Gallons per Hour of Size 5A (1 1/2″) Series 1A Ejector

Suction Lift in Feet Discharge Head in Feet Suction Water Temp. 70o F Operating Steam Pressure Suction Water Temp. 100o F Operating Steam Pressure Suction Water Temp. 130o F Operating Steam Pressure
30 60 90 120 150 30 60 90 120 150 30 60 90 120 150
2 0 2700 2760 2580 2280 2040 2580 2520 2280 2060 1830 2160 1950 1740 1620 1500
10 1500 2760 2580 2280 2040 2100 2520 2280 2060 1830 2040 1950 1740 1620 1500
20 2760 2580 2280 2040 2520 2280 2060 1830 1950 1740 1620 1500
30 2580 2580 2280 2040 2520 2280 2060 1830 1950 1740 1620 1500
40 1920 2580 2280 2040 1920 2280 2060 1830 1950 1740 1620 1500
60 2500 2280 2040 2280 2060 1830 1740 1620 1500
80 2280 2040 2060 1830 1620 1500
100 2040 1830 1500
10 0 2520 2240 1950 1740 1500 2150 1950 1700 1500 1350 1700 1580 1380 1200
10 1080 2240 1950 1740 1500 1100 1950 1700 1500 1350 1100 1580 1380 1200
20 2240 1950 1740 1500 1950 1700 1500 1350 1580 1380 1200
30 2240 1950 1740 1500 1950 1700 1500 1350 1580 1380 1200
40 1980 1950 1740 1500 1800 1700 1500 1350 1380 1200
60 1950 1740 1500 1700 1500 1350 1380 1200
80 1740 1500 1500 1350 1200
100 1500
20 0 1600 1260 1000 800 720 1290 1050 840 840
10 300 1260 1000 800 720 600 1050 840 600
20 1260 1000 800 720 1050 840
30 1260 1000 800 720 1050 840
40 1000 800 720 840
60 800 720
80 720

 

 

 

 

Performance Factors for Other Ejector Sizes

Ejector Size No 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.
Performance Factor .13 .25 .40 .70 1.0 1.7 2.8 4.5

Air Handling Capacity in Cubic Feet per Minute of Standard Air for No. 5 (1 1/2″) Ejector at Various Steam Pressures and Vacuums

Operating Steam or Air Pressure Atmospheric Suction Vacuum at Suction in Inches of Mercury at Atmospheric Discharge
With Discharge Head Up To Capacity 5 10 15 20
20 2 #/ Sq. in. 37 26 17 10
40 7 #/ Sq. in. 34 23.5 16 9.5 4.00
60 12 #/ Sq. in. 29.5 22 16 9.5 5.50
80 18 #/ Sq. in. 25 19 13 9.0 5.00

 

Values given in the table below are based in the ‘Evacuation of Air’ or non-condensable gases from closed systems and give the size of system in cubic feet which can be evacuated to a given vacuum in one minute

Capacities for priming centrifugal pumps or syphons are approximately 40% of the values given in the table.

Ejector Size No. Operating Steam or Air Pressure Final Vacuum in inches of Mercury or approximate left in feet of Water
5 10 15 20
1. 40 29 9 4 2
2. 40 50 17 7 4
3. 40 125 34 17 8
4. 40 190 60 25 11
5. 40 250 89 42 21
6. 40 450 160 75 38
7. 40 720 240 135 64
8. 40 1000 380 200 100

 

 

 

 

The table below indicates the steam consumption. To obtain the approximate air consumption in cubic feet per minute multiply by 20.

Operating Steam Gauge Pressure Ejector Size No.
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.
30 0.6 1.1 1.8 3.2 4.5 7.6 12.4 21.5
60 1.0 1.9 3.1 5.4 7.6 12.8 21.1 36.6
90 1.4 2.6 4.2 7.4 10.5 17.6 29.0 50.0
120 1.8 3.3 5.5 9.5 13.5 22.6 37.2 64.6
150 2.2 4.1 6.7 11.6 16.5 27.7 45.5 78.9

 

Lifts 22 to 25 FeetA Forcing ejector of sufficient power to elevate 1 foot  per each 1 1/4 to 1 3/4 lb. of steam. This model in a range of eight sizes is of all bronze construction, has no moving parts and its likelihood of getting out of order in remote. In operation it is almost noiseless. Replacement parts may be purchased separately; see the illustration.
When supplying ejectors neither the strainer not socket is included – they must be purchased separately.
For sizes, capacities and steam consumption, refer to the chart.

 

INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF BROWN EJECTORS


Installation

Brown Ejectors will operate in any position but should be installed with minimum length of piping and as few elbows, valves and restrictions as possible.

When the application requires that fluids be lifted by suction, the ejector should be located as close to the liquid level as practical with the balance of elevation being on the discharge side.

Pressure supply piping should be adequate to supply the quantity of operating medium to the ejector nozzle without causing a drop in the pressure sufficient to impair the operating efficiency of the ejector.

Suction piping must be tight to insure maximum capacity and highest possible vacuums. When lifting liquids the suction piping should be sized so that the velocity does not exceed 4 feet per second. Suction strainers or foot valves, if used, should be of a size and design to prevent resistance to fluid flow.

Discharge piping should be the full size of the ejector discharge connection and, if the line is long, it should be increased in size so as to keep the discharge head to a minimum.

On water operated units required to produce a vacuum at suction, it is necessary to install a check valve in the discharge line, change the direction of the piping, or terminate discharge line below water level so that a seal can be effected when starting.

 

Operation

When starting steam jet pumps that are required to lift and elevate liquids by suction, steam operating valve should be opened slowly so that the unit will prime quickly. At this time, valve should be opened to a point that will provide the most efficient operating pressure for the conditions of operation. Discharge line should be open when starting so that the flow of steam will not be affected by excessive back pressure. After ejector is primed, it will operate against discharge heads as indicated in capacity tables. Condensate should be eliminated from steam lines before operating ejectors.

On application requiring the priming of centrifugal pumps, open the ejector suction valve and then open the ejector supply valve. When the pump casing has been evacuated, start pump, then close suction valve after which ejector supply valve may be shut off.

 

Maintenance and Service Parts

If properly selected to suit conditions, ejectors will operate over long periods of time without the necessity for renewal of parts. Faulty operation, particularly on the small units, may be due to obstruction in jets due to pipe scale or foreign matter. Installation of suitable strainers in the supply and suction lines will eliminate further trouble.

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